B.C. Utilities Commission

Premier Christy Clark has already taken off the table the one thing that leaves Canada's three other public auto insurers in decent financial shape: no-fault insurance. Makes one wonder who is so strongly opposed to the idea? Likely, a group that does well with the current regime. Lawyers spring to mind.
According to Martyn Brown, "No corporation, no industry, no union gives the level of money that they give to politicians without expecting special consideration in return, and they do get it." Here's a sampling of what "special considerations" might mean.
Former prime minister Stephen Harper's government issued 14 permits for work on the $9-billion Site C dam during the writ period of the last election -- a move that was offside according to people familiar with the project and the workings of the federal government.
"...it is a terrible message to send when you have BC Hydro behaving in this way."
Former BC Hydro CEO Marc Eliesen says ratepayers will face a "devastating" increase in their electricity bills if the Site C dam is built
Does Site C make sense for the people of B.C.? There are five key reasons why it's not.
VANCOUVER - The Insurance Corporation of British Columbia is aiming to hike basic insurance rates by 5.2 per cent. Spokesman
Opponents of the proposed Site C dam are hoping a report from the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency panel, to be released Thursday, will emphasize potential environmental damage from the massive dam and persuade the federal and provincial governments that the project should be scrapped.
VICTORIA - Energy Minister Rich Coleman has ordered a 50-per-cent cut in proposed rate increases for BC Hydro customers, saying