benjamin netanyahu

It was the bloodiest single day for Palestinians since 2014.
He backtracked just hours after announcing the agreement.
U.S. President Donald Trump visited the Middle East and met with leaders of many countries in a few short days. During this brief visit he seems to have solidified his position to an extent that makes it possible to push a deal between the Israelis and the Palestinians. Is it good news? I am not so sure.
"So sad!"
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau met with his Israeli counterpart for the first time as prime minister during a side meeting
Since the jihadist terrorist assault on Paris, the most glaring double standard has come into view. It seems that while the victims in France have our sympathy and concern, the Jews murdered by Arabs in Jerusalem and other cities in Israel do not.
In the past two weeks, Israel has borne the brunt of hundreds of terror attacks. Terror doesn't occur in a vacuum and terrorists are born from nurture, not nature. Fanning the flames and provoking this recent terror war is a sustained campaign of incitement to violence, indoctrination of hate and justification of terror.
Despite the vitriol stemming from both capitals, the extremist threat is the appropriate issue to spark a strategic recalculation in Tehran and Tel Aviv, even if temporary. Although the idea of Iranian-Israeli engagement may seem to be rooted in fantasy, the same factors that prompted the United States and Iran to try something new can and should drive Iran and Israel to follow suit.
In a weekend interview with The New York Times published Sunday, the president insisted the United States would stand by
Netanyahu would shift his strategic communications, his core messaging and narrative, he would now run his political campaign from the hard right of his traditional electoral pool, he would have time to adjust once elected when he would recover the center he needed to govern, but right now pragmatic realism would have to take center stage.