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big data

Subject to individuals' right to opt out, all health data generated as a result of public spending should be made publicly available at zero or low cost.
We need people capable of extracting and interpreting information from mounds of data to make smart decisions.
Let’s be real -- there’s nothing better than finding out a restaurant, café, or clothing store offers free Wi-Fi. Getting online quickly, easily and for free is a simple way to feel connected to our friends, coworkers, and our favourite brands. It’s the little things that make us feel valued.
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It's hard to imagine life without the Internet. Browsing the web has become so second nature to us that we share sensitive
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The world runs on data. Businesses are inundated by it. From information received from mobile phones, sensor networks and Internet of Things-enabled devices, industries have a world of information at their fingertips. But making sense of all this data is no easy endeavour.
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Businesses of all sizes are adjusting their business models to find success. As cost-competition and accessibility are forcing prices down, margins are decreasing. The result of this is that businesses must now sell to larger markets to see the returns they had historically experienced.
Canadians have a powerful resource at their fingertips that will transform how we screen, diagnose, treat, and provide support for those of us touched by cancer: our health data. Yet, accessing this resource is hindered by misconceptions about how and why health data can (and should) be used.
Whether it's a full scale legacy system overhaul, or simply moving to social media channels to better engage with  audiences, companies don't have the luxury of time  on their side to pursue digital transformation as late adopters.  
Cities around the world are collecting data on all of the same things, yet the way that it is being measured is wildly uneven. WCCD and its work in developing ISO 37120 - the first international standard on indicators for sustainable cities changed all of that.
If our economy is shifting, how much emphasis do we really need to place on filling predicted shortages and attracting more young people to the trades? While we focus so much on the digital space, we can't forget that Canada is about to make massive investments in physical infrastructure.