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bike lanes

More condo builders are coming up to speed in catering to this growing demand.
Campaign promises. Bah! There should be a rule preventing candidates from making them. Because they rarely, if ever, deliver
The upgrades aim to improve the intersection with the city's second-highest number of collisions.
Rob Ford smoked crack. So what? Oh, and he plans to run for a second term as Mayor of the Greater Toronto Area in the Fall 2014 election. Really? Here is a prescription for six actions that would be good for Toronto in 2014, even if by default they result in four more years of Mayor Rob Ford.
We have a pent up, unsatisfied demand for cycling in Toronto. And what a good thing that is -- less pollution, less noise, healthier population, less congestion, less carbon and happier people. So why can't we get it right? While we rip up, at great cost, the one real bike lane that was created and sit and debate whether to build a subway or LRT for the 47th time, bikers are getting killed and congestion becomes unbearable.
Ever since the 1950s the car has been the accidental architect of our cities. Billions of dollars have been dedicated to roads, overpasses, tunnels and other car infrastructure. Enter the bicycle. It is the most efficient form of transportation on the planet.
There's too much pitting of self-described "drivers" and "cyclists" against each other. Most North American families are actually multi-modal - they drive, walk, and probably take transit and bike in at least certain circumstances, if not routinely. Certainly many who cycle, also drive, and visa versa. We need a more sophisticated discussion about how we get around in cities, and it starts with this -- it's not about loving your bike. It's about loving what biking does for cities.
Walking into Dufferin Grove Park on Saturday (Sept. 10, 2011), a bright sunny afternoon, the last thing I expected to see
In some European cities, planners are finding that making life more difficult for drivers while providing incentives for people to take transit, walk, or cycle creates numerous benefits, from reducing pollution and smog-related health problems to cutting greenhouse gas emissions and making cities safer and friendlier.
Cars parked in the bike lane are a common nuisance for urban cyclists the world over. Sadly, it's a problem that few cities