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bill c-13

As Canadians debate numerous items of legislation that could affect their privacy rights — from the new anti-terrorism bill
Like an overwhelming number of Canadians, you said -- publicly -- that you didn't want to grant telecom providers immunity for handing over our sensitive private information to government without a warrant. But then at the last minute something changed. You voted for the Bill in Parliament, and I don't mind telling you that was a huge disappointment. I also can't help but detect a hint of shame in the blog post that you wrote explaining why you turned around and supported the Bill after speaking out so vociferously against it.
Over an 11-week sitting, which began Sept. 15 and wrapped up Dec. 12, just 10 government-proposed bills made it to the parliamentary
Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien warned senators today that the increased police powers proposed in the government's
The potential destruction of terrorism is infinitesimally smaller than the damage done to our rights by a disproportionate attempt to prevent it. Please. Please remember this. It's even more important now, when that fact is so easily forgotten in the wake of the attack on our Parliament and the tragic deaths of Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent and Cpl. Nathan Cirillo. We cannot allow the extreme actions of a few to strip us of the freedoms those soldiers worked so hard to protect. But the Canadian government continues to roll back our rights in the name of "security."
It's not cyber-bullying, it's cyber-rape. Imagine you receive an email containing a naked picture of you in a sexual position. You remember, that one that you sent your lover. The email is linked to a site where more images of your naked and vulnerable body are displayed followed by hateful comments, complete strangers tearing you apart, a cybermob virtually raping you. The site includes your full name, your home address, your contact information. Some of the commenters threaten to come to your home and rape you.
The Harper government is set to push through a bill that critics say the Supreme Court has already in effect struck down
Canadian government officials requested subscriber information from telecoms at least 1.13 million times per year between
A new poll suggests Canadians are giving a thumbs down to the Conservative government's cyberbullying legislation, at least
Photo credit: The Canadian Press The Conservative government prides itself on being a strong defender of Canada's armed forces