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bill c-30

As 2013 draws to a close, Huffington Post Canada's Ottawa Bureau Chief Althia Raj put questions from readers to Tory House
Wednesday, Peter MacKay, the new Justice Minister, unveiled Bill C-13, the Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act. The similarly-named bill is now marketed as an effort to crack-down cyber-bullying, yet the vast majority of the bill simply brings back many (though not all) lawful access provisions. As this post suggests, some of the provisions raise some serious concerns. Yet the government is signalling that it would prefer to avoid such debates, wrapping up the provisions in the cyber-bullying flag and backtracking on a commitment made earlier this year to not bring forward Criminal Code amendments that were contained in Bill C-30.
A controversial bill that would have given the federal government greater power to track Canadians online included a provision
The current terrain of Canadian spying legislation is complex. Bill C-30 is dead, and that is cause to celebrate. But it's also important to remain vigilant. Serious questions remain over bill C-55 and its so-called "emergency" situations, as well as how long authorities can continue to monitor communications after getting approval for intercept. At the same time, bill C-55 represents an opportunity to limit warrantless wiretaps to emergency situations only. Such a stipulation would prevent future attempts at mass surveillance along the lines of bill C-30.
The notorious online "snooping" bill, C-30, looks like it may be coming back for round two. But people shouldn't be complacent as efforts are underway to put C-30 back on the agenda. Towes claims that getting access to subscriber data is simply like getting access to a phone book. The privacy commissioners of Canada disagree. Canadians aren't fools. Privacy matters to us. So does balance. Justifications for online snooping by the state are not going to be solved by invoking buzzwords and bogeymen.
The Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police renewed its call for Internet surveillance legislation on Friday, urging the government to move forward with Bill C-30. It is striking that the government never mentioned cyber-bullying when it introduced Bill C-30. That is because the bill has little to do with cyber-bullying.
The controversial online surveillance Bill C-30 would help police catch criminal suspects such as Luka Rocco Magnotta more
When Public Safety Minister Vic Toews introduced the latest version of the “online spying” bill in February, he wasted little
The Canadian government's plans for its bill to give law enforcement greater powers over consumer internet information may
Public Safety Minister Vic Toews is denying reports that the Harper government intends to quietly shelve its controversial