Bill C-51

MPs on the justice committee agree to keep Section 176 of Criminal Code.
Bill C-51 is misguided in that it seeks to solve a very serious social issue by altering the rules of our judicial system.
Bill C-59 does not fix the ills of Bill C-51 and fails to place the protection of Canadians' rights at the heart of our country's national security.
The recommendations come from a Grit-dominated committee.
The ICLMG simply cannot support Bill C-22 in its current form. Not only will it not create a Committee of Parliamentarians capable of real and strong oversight over our national security apparatus, its mere creation will give Canadians the impression that proper parliamentary oversight exists - which will not be the case.
The idea that the prime minister can get away with tiptoeing around Trump's attack on international law and human rights isn't going to cut it. As much as Canada has economic interests, we have moral interests. And this isn't simply a question of values. This is also a matter of standing up for Canada's vital interests.
Trump has undoubtedly emboldened Islamophobes across North America, but Canada has our own history with Islamophobia that we need to talk about. From 2012 to 2014, we saw hate crimes against Muslims in Canada double - and this is all while most of us knew Donald Trump as the host of The Apprentice.
In 2011, the government introduced a ministerial directive that allows, under exceptional circumstances, for information garnered under torture by a foreign country to be transmitted to and used by Canadian security agencies. These kinds of directives play a clear role in perpetuating human rights abuses.
He's been given a peace bond.
The RCMP feels that its voice and the voices of other law enforcement agencies aren't being heard in the government's public consultation on national security, which runs online until midnight PST December 15. Could something so weighted towards police powers have truly excluded the police?