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bill c-60

"We have introduced a number of bills, as you know, rather late in the session that demonstrate what will be the core of an agenda for a Conservative government… when we return in the fall."
If the CBC were to become an advertising-free service on both radio and television, as its supporters are demanding in ever-growing numbers, this fig-leaf rationale for unwarranted secrecy and arbitrary decision-making would be stripped away. A more truly accountable public broadcaster would be the result.
So what's all this fuss the lefties are making about Prime Minister Harper trying to keep track of costs at the CBC by writing a few words into the back of his omnibus budget, Bill C-60? But what's the difference between a public broadcaster and a state broadcaster? I've worked for both. So I can tell you what's the difference.
In recent days there has been much focus on the CBC and the government's intentions to control it. Provisions in Bill C-60 will effectively change the way the CBC is run and funded. But why should we care? And what does it mean for us as Canadians?
No public broadcaster anywhere in the free world faces the degree of political interference as that proposed for the CBC in Bill C-60. The government's latest Omnibus Budget legislation would make the Prime Minister the ultimate boss of all of the CBC's employees if the government takes control of collective bargaining at the CBC as Bill C-60 proposes to do. Governments do not control the public broadcaster in free and democratic countries. Along with other media outlets, public broadcasters hold governments to account, a role that depends on being completely independent of the government of the day.
A coalition of activist groups says it has collected more than 120,000 signatures on a petition against Bill C-60, the Harper
The Harper government is quietly seizing greater control of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, while a public advocacy