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Bill Gates

As the founder of Microsoft, there are few people on the planet who have helped to guide technological progression (at least in the realm of computing) as much as Gates over the course of his 42-year career. The thrust of his argument is this: if robots replace human workers whose pay would otherwise be taxed, why then should the labour of the robots not also be subject to taxation?
Some Boomers lost their way along the hippy highway over the last fifty years. They took a right turn into casinos and consumerism. Seared in my brain is watching a load of Boomer casino goers unload from a bus and waddle away. Poker chips in hand as they sink into the windowless abyss. Money (both having it and losing it) does things to people. Here's what it did to me.
The trouble with innovation, though, is that it isn't easy. Creating the next big thing requires the stars to align. Hard work and luck are both parts of the equation, but there's another trait that makes innovation possible -- creativity. Creativity is the key to innovation, and it's what makes entrepreneur culture so enticing.
Successful people don't live in the past. We learn from our past mistakes. But to dwell on them keeps us from moving forward. We need to focus on who we want to be not who we were.
Quite frankly I would rather have our government express ambitious goals that will stretch their capability than easily met goals. Is this not the reason they were elected? Similarly for Canadians as a whole. Why should we not have audacious and ambitious goals in our lives that challenge us every day and give us reason to get out of bed every morning fully alive and ready to do our best toward meeting the goals?
Talk about high tech.
Canada made a concerted effort to end malaria deaths in this country a century ago and is now supporting efforts to do the same around the world as part of leadership on MNCH. I'm optimistic that the discussion around 'no missed opportunities' will help move us much more quickly towards a world free of preventable deaths among women and children and one free of diseases like malaria.
As we get busier and take on more tasks and challenges just to get by, we are increasingly finding comfort in many icons of our time who tell us that failing is ultimately the best way to learn and move forward. They say that we must celebrate our strengths and weaknesses and not worry about how others judge us.
It’s a long-shot, and critics say it’s little more than a publicity stunt, but two Quebec City area mayors have found a novel
While my desktop computer sits in the shop, I find myself sitting at the dining room table with an ancient, steam-driven