billionaires

China and the U.S. are leading the world, a new 2020 rich list says.
They include the founders of Shopify and Uber.
There's no one path to obscene wealth, but some are better than others.
It is clear that people around the world are angry and disillusioned with the global economy. Growing inequality has left much of humanity struggling to make ends meet while the richest one per cent continues to profit. This rampant inequality is a sure sign our economic model is broken.
That brings their total worth up to $4.4 trillion.
And it's all thanks to Asia.
This is the face of Donald Sterling. And those are the brothers Koch, Charles and David, who spend most of their money trying to help others with no thought of benefit for themselves. These three men belong to one of America's fastest growing disadvantaged groups: billionaires.
In China, crooks don't have to go to the casino because intermediaries called "junkets" will swap Yuan for gambling chips that can be cashed into Hong Kong or Macao currency at the casino then wired by Hong Kong banks to tax havens or accomplices offshore. The goal is to buy a condo or luxury goods with funds from a trust managed by a shell company in Grand Cayman, owned by another trust in Guernsey with an account in Luxembourg managed by a Swiss banker who doesn't know who the owner is.
This year Forbes has uncovered a record 1,426 billionaires. That is 200 more than we found in 2012, another record breaking