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bipolar

It is well-known that heart disease is society's leading killer. In contrast, it is largely unrecognized that people with bipolar disorder are at particularly high risk of heart disease.
The trouble is, there is no recipe book for prescribing psychiatric medications. Every individual is unique, so with the guidance of their doctor, patients must find the treatment that's right for them. If a drug makes them feel worse, it's not the right drug, but that doesn't mean there are no other options. The right treatment must be found and sometimes that takes time, effort and creativity. Feeling like a zombie is never an acceptable outcome.
Riley, a fictitious patient, was first depressed in high school. "I remember not caring about anything. I didn't see my friends
Physicians have not effectively confronted pot-related myths, nor have we adequately educated our patients. When I tell parents about marijuana's risks, they often express shock. Many believe it's like oregano... a safe "natural product" that adds a little spice to life. But pot is not benign.
My name is Sana. I am 31 years old, mother to a little baby girl, and wife to a major techie. I'm also a writer, journalist and artist. And, as much as I dislike the usage of labels, you can add another label to my being. I am bipolar. Everyone's experience with their disorder is different, much like how we, as individuals, are so unique. I no longer want to be ashamed of being bipolar.
Sadly, those who are closed-minded to the reality of depression as an actual illness will be the ones who will find information about mental illness unwelcome, unnecessary and imaginary.
Now that I've experienced stability in mild doses as my medication is regularly tweaked to find the right balance, I question myself often. Is my thought to return to school to get my Masters something I really want? Or is it residual hypomania egging me on? I still wake at night and watch as the thoughts battle each other for my undivided attention.
Everyone feels sad from time to time. But when the sadness doesn't stop and emotions start to interfere with life, that person may be depressed. Winston Churchill called his depression his "black dog."
Leslie Bennett is an intelligent, open-minded and highly-accomplished businesswoman who has fought the good fight with bipolar I -- and is now thriving. At one point, because of Bennett's manic episode, she had convinced herself that the people coming to visit her were not her family, but clones of them.
By: Katie Kerns Many people with bipolar disorder don’t even know they have it. Fewer than half of people in the United States