book publishing

Today, May 17th marks the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia, and Biphobia (IDAHOT) -- a global celebration of gender and sexual diversity. This year, 2017, the theme is focused on families. We know that family support is critical to the health and well-being of LGBTQ2S young people. We also know that not all LGBTQ2S young people receive support from their families of origin, and that the consequences of family rejection can have a lasting negative impact on youth.
Resiliency is the ability to recover -- in other words, to return to a prior state of health. That's great, but what if you start life at such a deficit that you never had that state of wellness to begin with? If your life then slides even further downhill as an adult, the best you can hope for under the terms of resiliency is to return to your previous condition.
It has become clear to me recently that not only do people not know where to start, but often they don't know what to write about. As someone who just writes, because I love writing, I have come to understand that it is not that way for everyone.
I've wondered what to do about Canada's literary scene for some time. If you follow literary events closely, you'll see a lot of white faces on the lineups and in the promotions. In a multicultural country like Canada, that kind of oversight is a significant problem publishing professionals and festival organizers can't afford to ignore.
Alice in Wonderland continues its comeback streak with Hollywood star Scarlett Johansson's audio version of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland via Audible Studios, an Amazon company. Audible says, "It tells the story of the young and imaginative Alice, who grows weary of her storybook, one 'without pictures or conversations,' and follows a hasty hare underground -- to come face to face with a host of strange and fantastic characters."
Apple launches are the stuff of legends; they cause lineups for days, stores to sell out, and months of back orders for their newest products. You can use the same marketing techniques as Apple to successfully launch your own book as well. There are four techniques you can use that won't break the bank and will help build a cult around your book.
Since I was a little, I knew what I wanted to be: a journalist. My career aspirations helped define my personality and helped shape my world view. It influenced where I went to school, what I majored in, and who I hung out with -- until suddenly, one day, those aspirations changed.
Frankly I think it's at least partially our fault as an environmental movement that this framing has stuck. We haven't focused enough on specific solutions over the years. We have opposed bad ideas like pipelines with vague notions of carbon taxes or non-specific alternative energy projects. We have rarely proposed or even broadly supported specific alternative projects.
Literary writing is a worthless profession. Few who write novels, stories and poems make a living from them. This has been true for millennia. Lately the Internet has regressed into a society of feudal manors lorded over by tech giants like Amazon, Apple and Yahoo, who sell e-books for 99 cents or give them away for free. Their "competitive pricing" is threatening traditional publishers and physical books with extinction.
Canadian book publishing is more of a hobby than a profession. The more I write books and promote them, the more likely I am to end up on the dole. Very, very few people in Canada make a living from writing books. I hope to, but the chances are slim to none. So why do it?