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brain tumour

"The symptoms are not avoidable — you can't sit at home and not seek care."
We know that time may be limited but that's no reason to stop living. So we celebrate that. Every good scan we have a little party or a high-five or a hug. Hugs are common in our clinic. There's much more happiness than people would expect.
Going to a funeral is difficult. That deafening silence in the chapel brings back painful memories and stirs up emotions
When it comes to fighting brain tumours, having a strong and supportive team is the greatest weapon. I've been a social worker on the neurosurgery floor of a hospital for over 26 years. As one of the first people to have contact with a newly diagnosed brain tumour patient, I can attest that a strong network, a resilient team, is one of the greatest assets a patient, and their families, can equip themselves with as they begin this new chapter of their lives.
In my post last week I shared a bit about October's Brain Tumour Awareness Month, but also about the hope and strength of
This October 837 Canadians will hear the words, "you have a brain tumour." And these newly diagnosed patients and their families will add their voice to the chorus of 55,000 survivors, like me, across Canada as part of Brain Tumour Awareness Month.
In my inaugural posting I introduced myself and my journey, to demonstrate how it has brought me to where I am today. I also
It has been almost 17 years since I heard the startling words that changed my life forever. "You have a brain tumour" -- those five little words had the power to turn my life upside down and set me on a completely different course in life.