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Brian Williams

He even misused a lyric to set the scene.
Don't ever change, Twitter.
It's been clear for some time now that television network news is no longer solely populated by journalists. It's not for nothing that the coined word infotainment has gained currency. In an atmosphere like that, is it any wonder that news correspondents become news personalities who in turn become Hollywood stars?
I sit on the periphery of journalism. A PR guy who needs journalists for business purposes and appreciates a good read, too. So I have been struck that this week the biggest news stories have been, well, about news.
What trends on social media determines what makes the headlines by mass news media now, not the reverse. The change in the delivery of news forces us all to do what good authentic journalists already do and that's ask questions, ask questions and ask more questions until you are certain the story is right.
Sir Mix-a-Lot is having a moment. First the Seattle rapper and derriere enthusiast performed his timeless ode to posteriors
Even before the Games began, it seemed Bell and Rogers decided to stick with selling cellphones and they aren't interested in the next Olympics (which have gone to CBC). Now, the viewing numbers are excellent of course. But they're no more than a rather dubious measurement of eyes in front of TV sets, computers and various gadgets. They're not indications of satisfaction. Or dissatisfaction. For the record though, here are some things in CTV's evening prime time coverage that certainly could have been done better...
2012-07-25-olympicbanner.png I start to get the feeling that host Brian Williams seriously outclasses the broadcast talent around him. He's the pro. The reporters and analysts supporting him are mostly sports groupies. Over the next couple of evenings, I become certain of it.
2012-07-25-olympicbanner.pngAs you undoubtedly know, the summer Olympics are gearing up in London for 2012. Surely you've seen massive amounts of coverage so far -- and the Opening Ceremonies haven't even begun! But just in case you want to slog through the rest and get to the best, here's your unofficial guide to "everything" that's "important" for the 2010 Summer Olympics in London, England.
The biggest fault of The NBC newsmagazine broadcast Rock Center is that it remains no more than an hour-long extension of Williams' Nightly News, with the occasional bit of humour. While it's intentions are strong and admirable, it feels caught between a talk show and a news program.