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business relationships

This week I was on a panel at a professional association to talk about business networking. In my mind business networking
Your clients may see you as the "go-to" person in your business. However, in order to keep your business robust you need to bring in new clients while making your existing clients more profitable to your business.
A lack of soft skills will take a toll on the bottom line. Prospects hate to feel like they are merely potential revenue sources for sales people who simply want to "hit their targets". Winning their business should involve much more than a sales call, presentation, or a lunch.
When we meet someone for the first time, our primitive brain decides instantly whether the person is a potential ally, enemy or somewhere in between. Our minds are made up during the first critical seconds of visual contact. Too often, our instincts protect us unnecessarily by sending visual cues that say, "Stay away."
I run my business with house rules and boundaries in place, and I made the error of bending many of those policies to accommodate one person. Unfortunately, it resulted in them assuming all of our rules and agreements held no ground.
The stress generated by unhealthy client relationships may eventually cause you to question your ability to run a business. If you don't value your skills, you may lose your resilience in the face of undue criticism, which can make you more vulnerable to being exploited.
Qualified referrals can be the oxygen that keeps careers and businesses alive and thriving. Asking for referrals has become an accepted practice and few people are offended. On their websites, business cards and in concluding comments to client communications, many professionals note that referrals are important to them and they always appreciate receiving them.
Good referrals are the lifeblood of any business. We work hard to earn referrals from those we trust and are usually grateful when we receive them. Despite their best intentions, friends, colleagues, and clients (your advocates) sometimes refer us people we either aren't suited to help, or simply don't like.
Over the last four decades, Asia has seen immense global economic growth. But what does this mean for you as a global business traveller? Whether you are an executive, entrepreneur, or emerging leader, knowing more about how your Asian counterparts do business will give you a distinct competitive advantage and allow you to build successful, long-lasting business relationships.
Rapid innovation in communication has led to a communications crisis, fueled by the obstacles that create a challenge for professionals when trying to build both business and personal relationships. These obstacles include short attention spans and a need to interrupt to move a conversation along.