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c-suite

We have been raised all of our lives with the world trying to suppress who we are and telling us who we ought to be to fit in. How bizarre is it that we try to change who we are, to try and fit, versus just being more of ourselves and finding the opportunity that actually fits us?
When it comes to women in tech, we know there needs to be a shift in attitude. Especially for females first entering and aiming to follow a progressive career path. While many emerging into the industry from technology programs worldwide, once in their field, there is still little advancement into upper management positions.
Canadian companies have the potential to become more competitive if their boards are comprised of directors who are the most qualified in a greatly-expanded pool of potential directors. But to do this, we need increase the pace of change to achieve board diversity and gender parity.
The best female leaders have very high expectations for themselves and constantly raise the bar by seeking constructive criticism. Then, when told where they made mistakes, rather than berating themselves, they treat the feedback as an opportunity for growth and improvement. That constructive narrative enables them to separate criticism from feelings of self-worth.
One tweet that I wrote two years ago got me into the office of a C-suite executive and launched one of the most important relationships in my business today. I could have set up my meeting with her the old-fashioned way -- but Twitter helped me bypass potential obstacles and removed hierarchical barriers. Establishing yourself as a thought leader on Twitter can give you an edge.
So, do you want to live your life like a boss, calling the shots and living on top? Consider living life like a boss. Here are six tips from the business world that can improve your personal life too.
Two sets of criteria are part of your due diligence when making your decision to join a board of directors -- philosophical and practical -- and you need to assess both carefully before either accepting or passing on the invitation.
Successfully motivating business teams has been so frequently compared to coaching a winning sports team that I thought twice about using the popular sports metaphor in this post. But business success is driven by a united team whose members respect one another and recognize that each has very different roles -- and strengths.
As a business writer, people often ask me what books they should read to become better leaders. For years, my answer has been the same: read good fiction. If you want to learn how people think and behave, read a novel, a short story, or a play. Think of how effective we could be as leaders if we used our understanding of people to better empathize with our employees, clients, and boards.
Regulators have a poor track record of getting executive pay right. Indeed, some say U.S. Congress has been the single greatest driver of increasing CEO pay. According to a survey by Mercer, a majority of UK board members believe the executive pay model is broken. Here are three ways to fix it.