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c-suite

Likeability is not the ability to make people laugh or take centre stage all the time. It is about considerate behaviour and keeping promises that make people feel comfortable around you. You win them over by fuelling their belief that you are a trustworthy person who they can count on to do the right thing.
Last week, we hosted the first of two joint Summits in Vancouver between our organizations, The Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB) and The Canadian Board Diversity Council (CBDC). Both Summits focus on board governance, kick starting a critical national dialogue about the merits of strengthening these communication lines between Corporate Canada and aboriginal business leaders.
Back in the 1970s, there were few positive female role models as business leaders. We live in an information age, we need leaders who are great communicators, understand the need for team work, and can bring a nurturing spirit to the workplace. Women are naturally effective in these areas. Although women have not yet achieved quite the salary equity of men, nor rule the majority of Fortune 500 companies, this is all changing as women step into their natural leadership capacities. Good leadership does not require a particular gender, but an individual who has developed good character, integrity and wisdom.
Few managers and workers are immune to gossip, bad-mouthing, having their ideas stolen or being set up by others who want their job or status. But it is possible to be respectful to your colleagues by staying neutral and staying focused on your performance instead of the politics that may surround you and your team.
Trust at the board level is necessary at three intersection points: board and CEO, board member to board member, and CEO to C-suite. Why does trust matter? Think about the transactional costs of a low-trust relationship. In low trust relationships, suspicion abounds and parties feel compelled to paper every decision and every discussion. What can boards and executives do about this? Here is some advice.