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calories

Contrary to what the Ontario Ministry of Health is saying, listing calories on menus will not make us healthier. In fact, it can actually make some of us sicker. Giving people partial information with which they're supposed to make informed decisions is just not going to work.
Eating less may not be a problem if a person is reducing their level of physical activity. However, it is vital the diet is sufficient enough in calories and nutrients to maintain healthy organs, muscles, and bones. Skipping a meal every so often is not an issue for your body but when it becomes a regular occurrence it can lead to malnutrition and serious health problems.
Have you ever looked at the nutrition labels on a food product and wondered how to make sense of the information? If so, you're not alone! Food labels contain a lot of information, and it can be confusing to consumers.
Do you know your body's enemies? If weight gain is one of them, then it's useful to know exactly how it can get the better of you. Here's how: Our meal portions are too typically loaded with insulin-spiking processed carbohydrates. And we're conditioned to eat far too many of them. But why exactly do we indulge too much?
Seriously, it's a game-changer. This is all about cutting your daily caloric intake, while simultaneously optimizing your body's ability to burn fat. This can be done by way of a little daily caloric restriction.
Burgers and fries? Red light.
Get in our kitchen, now!
You might be surprised to learn that you don't just need to go to the gym or bundle up for a power walk to stay fit. Your daily chores can help burn calories and can add up to a personal fitness routine as well. There is a reason they call it housework. You can burn some serious calories during a marathon cleaning session.
The belief that eating out equals a lot of calories paralyzes many dieters -- they feel that in order to lose weight and maintain the loss, they have to stay away from restaurants forever. This is a depressing thought.
Storage Wars, Parking Wars, Shipping Wars. Those are all great shows to watch on TV. Diet Wars, however, is not a TV show, but rather a social media phenomenon I see daily. It's people arguing about the best approach to weight loss -- counting calories versus intuitive (mindful) eating.