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Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers

The oil industry isn't facing the coming reality of a low-carbon world, study argues.
Mere hours before the New York Times went to press with its look at the B.C. Liberal party's ethical scorecard, the party chose to get its 2016 fundraising results out ahead of the storm. One last chance at political counter-spin and what a marvel of spin it was. U.S. Republican party strategist Karl Rove would have been proud.
When teenagers at a Vancouver high school demanded in a November 2013 open letter/petition that the Canadian Association
"This is no time to be making change to an unknown commodity."
Fewer than one-in-ten post-secondary graduates find oil and gas industry associations credible and trustworthy when it comes to carbon emissions. That shouldn't come as a huge surprise given that industry associations like the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers have fought new greenhouse gas regulations and successfully lobbied to weaken Canada's environmental laws.
To Krause, it seemed suspicious that foundations from across the border were giving money to Canadian groups working on Canadian conservation and energy issues. It must be, Krause surmised, that these big foundations are spending their dollars to manipulate Canadian energy and environment politics to further American interests.
Will Canada's biggest oil and gas lobby group get to rewrite key clauses of the Species At Risk act to weaken recovery plans
I'm sure The Vancouver Sun's spotty coverage of the polling debate has much more to do with a lack of resources and the rush to get stories online than it has to do with the millions of dollars Enbridge and the oil industry spends with Postmedia -- but the optics aren't good.
The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers seems to be everywhere these days, selling the idea that the rapid development
Discussions surrounding the need for new pipelines to transport Canada's oil to market have been a dominant economic, environmental and political issue for the past several years. Canada's overwhelming reliance on the United States as a customer, the U.S.'s growing energy self-sufficiency, and limited pipeline infrastructure have placed a low ceiling on the prices Canadians are able to secure for our energy exports.