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Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Watching the CBC's 10-part television series Canada: The Story Of Us had me figuratively scratching my head. It left me flabbergasted and astounded. Critics have decried the series' anglo-centric slant on history. Respect should come from all sides, beginning with cordiality, recognition and representation.
Subway's chicken is barely more than half chicken DNA, researchers claimed.
Proposal would mean an extra cost of $12 per Canadian.
So there was this CBC-Angus Reid poll. You may have heard about it, or at least seen it while scrolling through your social media feeds this week. It was called the "Canadian Values" poll and it found, according to the original CBC headline, that Canadians want minorities to do more to 'fit in.' This poll made news because it revealed 68 per cent of Canadians thinking minorities should be "doing more to fit in" with mainstream society instead of keeping their own customs and languages. But what I found out after contacting Angus Reid was that 87 per cent of those respondents were white.
The CBC's fateful decision to move the national news and the long series of ill-formed, unaccountable decisions since then, makes it clear that an inexperienced, government-appointed president and board of directors is a root problem. The government's review should address this problem.
My advice to CBC brass is to not pick a replacement for Mansbridge just yet, but go back to the drawing board and see if they can design a new way to report the news that will address real journalistic concerns facing the nation, rather than simply reapplying lipstick to a format that needs to be retired along with its icon.
During the 2015 election campaign, the Liberals promised to restore CBC funding that was cut by the Conservative government.
Media managers are wondering what went wrong. They are asking why journalism doesn't pay any more. If the solutions are hard to discern, they have only to look at the technology they so eagerly embrace. It's the digital technology. It has spread throughout many industries including journalism, like a virus.
At a time when our consumption of the news is at an all-time high, the very institutions at the heart of our news media are in crisis -- and demanding the attention of our political leaders. Postmedia combined newsrooms in Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver in a move that not only saw many talented and dedicated journalists pushed out the door, but also saw distinctive voices quieted.
For many HuffPost readers, the oil industry is far away (in Alberta) and out of mind (except at the gas station). But the