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canadian election

The day after winning the election, Prime Minister Trudeau proclaimed to the world that 35 million Canadians were now "back" and the team behind him seemed to revel in that line. Such a bold claim within hours of an election win deserves some scrutiny to find out where Canada had been if we were now back.
The challenge isn't simply to get youth to vote. First, you have to inspire youth about the act of voting itself. There's no point in getting youth to vote if it's an activity they really would rather not be doing; that won't form a lifelong habit of voting. You have to first sell the benefits of voting before you can push youth to the polls.
While it takes time for a new prime minister to translate campaign rhetoric into effective policies, there are at least five quick-wins that Justin Trudeau can achieve on his very first day in office. All five can be implemented in a few minutes through simple orders-in-council at the cabinet table or by instructing new ministers in their mandate letters. Implementing the full range of changes promised in this last election campaign will take a long time, probably many years. Quick-wins will be important for Trudeau to show Canadians that his Liberal government can bring about the breadth and depth of change for which he was given a majority.
The whole Trudeau wave that is washing over social media isn't just about his looks. It is about so much more. The real reason that women are going on and on about him is simple. He is the epitome of the ideal man. A modern, relatable, ideal man. He checks all the boxes of the attributes many women consider to be the ultimate qualities a perfect mate or father would have. And many of those attributes would help a prime minister to excel in that role.
Check out our stopmotion Legomation brickfilm above to see everything turn out awesome for Justin Trudeau and the Liberals.
Big moment for Canada.
It's easy to be charmed by Liberal leader Justin Trudeau. He's affable, approachable, and seems to exude sincerity -- a breath of fresh air after 10 years of Conservative rule. More so than his stiff NDP opponent Tom Mulcair, it's increasingly Trudeau who seems like the natural choice for change in Ottawa. Until you remember the 1990s.
"Every generation or two kids get momentarily enthused ... but generally it's people in our generation that actually vote rigorously."
"There is a lot of intimidation and bullying tactics that I don’t like," said the NDP incumbent. Her Tory opponent replied: “It never happened."
If Canadians don't see a commitment for major change from Monday's winner, the nastiest and most divisive election in our history, by far, will be for naught.