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canadian health care

A Canadian woman who was injured in a skydiving accident in the U.S. is being flown home, but she owes $500,000 for her American
Dr. Danielle Martin just became Canada's newest hero. Martin, who serves as vice president at the Women's College Hospital
HuffPost Canada News Editor Michael Bolen explains what the viral video of a Canadian doctor schooling a Republican senator
Canadian health care is the best in the world. At least, that's what we like to tell ourselves. But the reality is that Canada
We actually know quite a lot about what makes Canadian health policy so effective. Population health approaches to improving social conditions, as well as public health prevention and health promotion measures taken across the country, have helped to reduce both chronic disease and acute illness. The Canadian portrait compares favourably to the American, but how does our healthcare investment compare to other developed nations in the study? Here, Canada falls short. Canada ranked 8th of 27 countries, while the US came in at 22nd.
In our quest for solutions to big health care challenges, we can sometimes overlook the low-hanging fruit -- i.e. the small, practical changes that can bring about substantial savings and better health outcomes. Case in point: the cost-savings opportunities in medication adherence through incentives, health IT and data applications.
Over the next three years, the Ontario government plans to begin partially funding hospitals based on the number of patients they treat and the quality of care they provide. It's an ambitious plan that could fall flat or set a new global benchmark. No country has yet managed to set a price on high-quality care.
2013-02-08-WT.jpg Policy planners and health-policy experts can build their models and do their studies, but patients want high-quality service now, they want it free and they want it effective. They pay their taxes for a health-care system that is among the most expensive in the world. They are not getting enough value for money. Why not?
A single-payer, universal system would not bankrupt the health care system. Quite the opposite, in fact; we're paying too much for prescription drugs now, and a single-payer system might just be what would save our health care system because it would be cheaper -- a lot cheaper.
Last week, the family that owns Shouldice Hospital announced that it would like to sell its facility to Centric Health, a for-profit company. When it comes to providing complicated medical and surgical care that must be customized for each individual patient, non-profits are generally better. Selling medicare off, piece by piece, to large for-profit companies is the wrong approach.