Canadian Healthcare

I am a Canadian who, twice, had to seek out services in the U.S that weren't readily available in Canada
Canadians who experience medical harm at the hands of the health-care system they pay for are often chagrined to learn that, if they pursue their legal remedies in court, they are also footing the bill to defend the very physicians they claim have harmed them. Now it seems that Canadian taxpayers have been victimized by this system, too.
When patients aren't receiving the care they need and their condition worsens, it takes more taxpayer money to attempt to treat them. The irreparable damage caused by this negligence in the system affects families, communities and the local economy.
The plaintiffs' constitutional challenge is straightforward: if the government does not provide timely medical treatment, then it cannot at the same time legally prohibit patients who are suffering on long wait lists from taking control of their own health care and arranging treatment privately.
The recent Saskatchewan leaders' debate has been criticized as a great deal of shouting with very little substance. This is disappointing, as elections are exciting moments to consider important ideas in the light of what matters most: our health and well-being.
We need to recognize that the arguments by health care providers, such as the Ontario Medical Association, that we increase government spending on health care are plain ugly and selfish. We are already paying some 49 per cent more capita for health care than are folk living in 29 better performing health care systems.
A start-up company is looking to establish a new business model in Saskatchewan. In worsening economic times, that might seem like great news. But if their business model is one that takes advantage of people's poverty and may undermine voluntary blood donations, then the prospect is far less appealing. If Canada did need to collect more blood, opening for-profit clinics is not the way to do it.
Currently, it's double the length of wait times that existed in 1993.
Aside from having healthy eyes and good vision, optometrists play a vital role in your overall health care. Most people don't know that as optometrists, we can identify other health conditions early such as diabetes, elevated cholesterol, MS and high blood pressure, which can often be first detected through an eye exam.