canadian human rights

They say the airline has a "toxic" work environment at sites across the country.
Is ethnic discrimination alive and well in Canada? Not according to a new CBC poll published this week in which 75 per cent of respondents say Canada is "a welcoming place for all ethnicities." An Insights West poll reported in the Vancouver Sun last month suggests, by contrast, that Canadians are not terribly willing to face the facts about ethnic discrimination, and that it is a bigger problem than most would like to think.
Monday, December 10 is International Human Rights Day. And on this day three Canadians remain in prison in Iran. Are we safer here in Canada? A vast body of Canadian law has been developed that upholds the rights of individuals even in the face of the most heinous crimes. But in Canada, today, in light of the cases of Mohamed Harkat, Mohammad Mahjoub and Mahmoud Jaballah, if someone thinks you are a terrorist -- and someone said you are a terrorist even under torture -- you may be arrested, thrown in prison, or placed under house arrest, tried without knowing the evidence against you and then deported.
The expertise that comes with age is enough to overcome the frailties that linger in the presumptions of those who say commercial