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candy

It may just be a sweet coincidence that October is both Dental Hygiene Month and Halloween but with Halloween just around the corner, your little ghosts and goblins are eager to hit the candy jackpot. But what else can be spookier than creepy crawlies and witches? Rotting teeth from too much sugar and dental plaque.
Way back in the day, like most of the candy we enjoy today, there was some natural twist to it. Marshmallows were made from marshmallow root, root beer used actual roots and licorice was derived from licorice root.
With Canadians planning to spend an average of $43 on decorations this year, those costs can sure add up. But no need to be frightened! Just like a classic Superman costume, these savvy saving tips are here to the rescue!
While most parents think of the oral health concerns or the sugar rush and hyperactivity that seems to follow candy, the health nut parent thinks of the long term effects. The body's internal response to all of that junk is not a small concern. Sugar can be brushed and flossed and rinsed off of the surface of the teeth, but once you've chewed and swallowed, your body is left to pay the consequences.
Telling kids that they can't eat candy at Halloween is not going to improve their diet. Teaching your kids how to make healthy choices all year round will. Changing someone's mindset shouldn't include taking something away from them that they look forward to -- it's just going to make them upset. Mindset-changing happens over time, with proper education.
I believe that it is normal to eat candy in moderation any time of the year. It is also normal to eat a little more after collecting the spoils of Halloween. Sure, it contains no vitamins or minerals or added physical benefits to our lives but eating a treat isn't about maximizing antioxidant intake.
I had this thought as I secretly stuffed a third mini-Mars bar into my mouth: my daughters are going to smell chocolate on
Candy can also have a darker side for parents who are trying to keep their kids as healthy as possible, or protect them from allergic reactions by restricting what candy their kids can have. Imagine how the kid feels when they have a food allergy and can't have candy -- seeing other kids reaping the benefits of their trick-or-treating, dumping out their huge bags of candy and sorting through what they got -- it's both sad and frustrating.
It's fair to say that many teens love getting something for nothing. Free candy? It fits the bill. And every October 31, they fail to disappoint, showing up at the door, thrusting a bag in the direction of unwitting participants, sometimes without even uttering the agreed request -- sometimes, the words "Trick or Treat" aren't even mentioned.
Perhaps by now you've seen the letter handed out by a woman in North Dakota to children she deems to be "moderately obese" who she thinks shouldn't be consuming candy this Halloween. There are so many things wrong with this I hardly know where to start.