Capital Punishment

"If you're willing to take me back, I'm willing to come home.''
Capital punishment was abolished in Canada 40 years ago.
The 75-year sentence handed down to convicted cop killer Justin Bourque has reignited the debate over the death penalty in Canada. Some are satisfied with what effectively will be a life sentence without parole for Mr. Bourque. Others think it's not enough and would like to see him executed. But is bringing back the death penalty the answer? The issue then becomes, how do we distinguish between murderers who can be rehabilitated and those who won't or can't?
As jurors in the Tori Stafford decide fate of accused child killer Michael Rafferty, the gruesome details of the case have renewed calls to bring back the death penalty in such brutal murders.
Keeping brutal murderers behind bars, feeding and educating them with taxpayer's money is an insult to the victims and a mockery to the justice system. The death penalty is the only punishment that suits the crime of murder; it creates a sense of balance in the scales of justice.
Is it imaginable that in the 21st century a modern woman and outstanding actress receives lashes for her art? Sadly such brutality is common in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Most tragic are the explanations by regime officials that they are defending moral values and the security of their country.
This week, Americans cheered as Amanda Knox was acquitted and her family closed the book on years of grueling uncertainty. Miss Knox's acquittal has been lauded as the achievement of justice in a fraught Italian legal system. But my family still struggles with the injustice of that system.