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carbon capture and storage

If you fly over a forest and look down, you'll see every green tree and plant reaching to the heavens to absorb the ultimate energy source: sunlight. What a contrast when you look down on a city or town with its naked roofs, asphalt roads and concrete sidewalks, all ignoring the sun's beneficence! Research shows we might benefit by thinking more like a forest.
Canada's plan to deal with Climate Change is aimed toward the successful development, transportation and marketing of our valuable oil and gas resources in western Canada, while protecting our clean air and clean water for generations to come. Both sides of this equation are equally important. Canadians want both a prosperous economy and a clean environment, together.
With more frequent, more severe and more damaging cycles of droughts and wildfires, storms and floods, it's clear that a more extreme and volatile climate is costly for Saskatchewan. Virtually everyone agrees that we need to prevent the worst consequences, as much as possible, and adapt to what we can't avoid.
Some see low fuel prices as good news, but there are many downsides. With driving becoming less costly, more cars and trucks could be on the road, which is good for the auto industry but bad in terms of pollution, climate change and traffic accidents. And because the price of oil is now lower than the cost to extract oilsands bitumen, the industry is starting to put the brakes on rapid expansion plans -- bad news for workers and businesses in Fort McMurray and those heavily invested in the industry but good news for the planet.
Algae is a pretty important organism. The first plants on earth probably evolved from algae. It's used in food, fertilizer and sewage treatment. Oh, and algae can also eat raw industrial smokestack emissions for breakfast.
Geoengineering to combat climate change is largely untested. Because we've stalled so long on reducing carbon emissions and still aren't doing enough, we may have to consider it. What will that mean?
President Obama's climate action announcement yesterday relies heavily on carbon capture and storage technology eventually
The budget tabled by the province last month was a tough pill to swallow for many Albertans, post-secondary students being
A $285-million green initiative to capture and store greenhouse gases in Alberta has been put on the chopping block. Market
According to a recent study, little is known about leaks from the 680,000 waste and injection sites in the U.S., but structural failures are common. In Alberta, taxpayers are on the hook for any problems that might arise once the carbon has been stored. We don't really know what effect pumping millions of tonnes of CO2 into the ground will have on bacteria and other organisms below the surface.