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carbon emissions

Climate pledges can make for good publicity, but they don’t always show the full picture.
The Liberals have been criticized for having two campaign planes.
We love our pickup trucks and SUVs, more so than any other people.
Canadian researchers blame telecoms and phone makers for creating an unsustainable business model.
Carbon emissions from electricity generation are set to start rising again.
The challenge of decarbonising the economy – the energy transition – is immense.
Canada, and not just Mexico, may be in for a rough ride when it renegotiates NAFTA with the United States. When it comes to fighting climate change, however, the ride will be rougher. Trade provisions will likely continue to be a stumbling block in any efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions.
It's estimated that about 18 per cent of all greenhouse gas emissions in Canada come from the cars we drive and how we drive them. With almost one-fifth of greenhouse gas emissions coming from our cars, there's a lot we can do to drive change and minimize our impact on the environment as motorists.
I have now realized that most economists operate under a very different concept of the nature of atmospheric carbon then ecologists like myself. Their paradigm turns any and all carbon into a market commodity to be manipulated by price and economic tools. They don't share the ecologist's concern that such a simplistic model can lead to truly dangerous and perverse public policy.
The reverse Robin Hood philosophy has been fully embraced by the Ontario government, an odd turn of events for the self-proclaimed "social justice premier." Nothing shows this philosophy better than the government's newest costly experiment, the cap-and-trade carbon tax.