cardiovascular disease

Pregnancy may cause long-term changes to the body, the study found.
There's little doubt white bread has become a symbol of poor health choices. For years, a war against the loaves has been waged in the hopes of convincing people to avoid intake. Canadians have been warned against even daring to eat this staple of Western life.
Here's the sobering truth: despite close to 40 years of substantial private and public investment, society has not come up with any meaningful medication to help those with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Today, some 750,000 Canadians live with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.
If Canadian adults increased their intake of cereal fibre by just one gram per day, there could be a reduction of health care costs related to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes by up to $143.2 million per year.
And seaweed provides flavour too!
Controlling obesity is never an easy prospect and for some, the best option is to undergo bariatric surgery. The practice has been around since the 1960s and involves restricting the volume of the stomach either with a band or through surgical removal of a large part of the stomach organ. There's also another factor in determining the benefit of this surgery: the microbes living in the gut. The tens of trillions of bacteria can also be affected by the change. Although this was known hypothetically for years, in 2010, it was shown for the first time.
Long before the health movement became popular, fish oil was recognized as a healthy part of a nutritious diet. The actual benefit didn't really become known until the 1970s when ingestion of these oils apparently led to better cardiovascular health. Within a few decades, the oil (as well as the fish itself) was suggested as a means to keep heart disease at bay. Today, we know of several chemicals contained within the oil that improve our health. Some of the best are the omega-3 fatty acids.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Studies to unveil the marvels of our daily hibernation -- and the deleterious effects of deprivation -- will continue and many more discoveries will be made. In the meantime, as the cold and flu season continues to spread in Canada, we should take heed from the research suggesting slumber is critical to health.
Reported online August 20 in the journal Brain, the new findings demonstrate for the first time that a group of inhibitory neurons, whose loss leads to sleep disruption in experimental animals, is substantially diminished among the elderly and individuals with Alzheimer's disease.