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career change

I hope this helps someone who's going through tough times. In my 20 years as a techie/journalist, I've been laid off three times. The first time, I was 25, and it destroyed me. I was young and had very little experience; I lacked a map for navigating.
Looking at the rapid arrival and departure of independent businesses in Canada, it's clear that sometimes we have to move on and try something else. For many professionals and business owners who are fully committed to their work, this is almost unthinkable. How do you know when it's time to reinvent yourself; to move on and try something else? And, how do you do so while taking advantage of the professional profile you've built up over several years?
You are an intelligent and talented person. You are not going to up and quit your job tomorrow without putting some kind of plan in place. Yes, there is some risk involved, but you're a smart cookie and you would never let it come to that. Stop the horror stories, already.
When I decided to start my own social media consulting business three years ago, I felt like I was jumping off a cliff; I could soar, or fall flat on my face. Could I pull it off? What if I didn't get enough business? What would people think? I was terrified. Going from full-time employee to entrepreneur was risky, but the upside was that I was doing what I loved. You can do it too.
It's a new year and you are one week into eating salad, and exercising more. You want to make more money but you aren't sure how. You think, "I will find a new job!" So in 2016 how will you make this year different? Without goals you will fail so just like any resolution you need to know what your true goals are and then narrow it down.
Are you on life's last lap and have yet to make a real difference? That's the angst of some boomers who came of age believing they would change the world, but then life got in the way. Now retiring from the jobs that derailed them from their dreams, they're hoping it's not too late to leave a legacy.
By tracking and responding to relevant trends, you can ensure you have the training you need, today and tomorrow, to maintain your competitive edge and to stretch yourself, limbering up, as you start the next chapter of your career.
Imagine that you didn't have to take flak from anyone, disappoint anyone, or impress anyone. Or pretend that everyone was so concerned with his or her own business that they wouldn't pay any notice to your own career choices. What would you choose if nobody was looking?
t job we get post-graduation is not going to be the one we remain in for our entire career. The days of spending decades at the same company are, by and large, behind us. Some may switch jobs once or twice, but others may have to cut their teeth in a dozen positions before finding the right fit.
Have you heard the expression "change is messy"? It's something I've heard and said many times over the years working with clients creating and navigating career (and other) changes. And in my own life, I've experienced my share of personal and professional change over the years. Who hasn't? Who won't?