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career change

Change isn't easy. No matter which way you slice it or dice it, change is never going to be a breeze. So is there ever a perfect time to embark on change? And this isn't some high-level theory of "Start today, there's no such thing as tomorrow." I'm talking about a more practical approach -- what time of year is best?
As a headhunter, I call people who are sitting at their desk already working, and as a recruiter, I get resumes and emails from people seeking employment. The difference between the two is extraordinary. If you are looking for work and wondering why no one is calling or emailing you back, here are the real reasons you aren't getting a job.
Just think of all the things you've done because of fear. Stayed in a shitty relationship. Failed to speak up. Studied the wrong thing. Did what you were told. Kept the soul-crushing job. Stayed small. Held back. Watched from the sidelines.
What does a university dean's resumé look like? I would guess that most have diverse leadership experience in a number of varied roles. My own work history includes stints as a barista, psychologist, professor, corporate executive and politician -- to name just a few of the hats I've worn during my career.
A client of mine liked to think in black and white. In her mind, you could either do a job you hate and make a ton of cash, or do a job you love and be dirt poor. No iPhone. It was one or the other. Without knowing it, she had tied the concepts of fulfilling work and poverty together.
A lot of people beat themselves up because they think they're supposed to know exactly what their ideal career looks like. So they refuse to experiment or to commit to even minor changes until they know what the big picture will look like in exacting detail.
Once the wheels were in motion to sell our house, I started to reflect on the idea of change and what that would mean for us. I'd have to quit the job that I loved, working in the culturally rich Winnipeg arts community and vacate the life that I set up for myself since moving to Winnipeg from Toronto.
Throughout my career I worked for some pretty awful companies. They were awful mostly because a couple of key people at the top were successful in creating a toxic work culture. Exclusion, discrimination, and bullying were the daily norm.
Every human being on earth crafts a unique set of biases based on his or her own experience -- you, me, and everybody else. We use this experience to dish out advice. But what works for one person (say, someone who loves you and wants only the best for you) might not work for you.
Ask an employee from just about any industry in Canada, and they'll tell you: there is a huge gap between the training required to move up the career ladder and the training provided by their employers. While 71 per cent of employers agree they have a responsibility to provide career management programs for their employees, only 29 per cent actually offer them.