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career change

In the course of my work as a career and entrepreneur coach, I have crossed paths with some fierce female entrepreneurs. Here, three of them -- a change agent, an artist, and a healer -- offer the inside scoop on what it's really like to start your own business.
In just a few short decades, the workplace has radically changed. Today, women constitute nearly half of the workforce. There have never been so many women in leadership positions around the world. And there has never been so much talk about being a woman in business. In fact, there has never been a better time in history to be a woman.
Yes, the Millennial Generation. The generation born between 1982 to 2002 that has been mischaracterized by many employers as lazy, incompetent and entitled, is the same Generation that is the best prepared for the changing nature of work. The reality is that the demands of today's Millennial Generation are the same demands that enable their own survival. The Millennial Generation is merely being motivated by self interest and self protection given today's economic and social constraints.
In our work lives, we are constantly asking questions, evaluating our options, and making decisions. This swirl of considerations can be overwhelming at times, and with so many questions to ask it can be hard to know which is more important. The most important career question you'll ever ask is only three letters long, but packs one heck of a punch. The question is...why?
A period of major change in one's life often provokes fear or anger, before making way for angst, uncertainty, and melancholy. And then, eventually, a more buoyant feeling of hope, optimism, and happiness. I have playlists of my own to help me through the change cycle -- for each stage.
I have had two breakdowns -- one after the end of my marriage, and a second one of the career/identity variety. Based on my experience from the first, I handled the second one differently. I fought the first one. Hard.
Many of us have experienced that moment when we question our career choice and start considering alternatives. It's natural, and our intuition is often right. When it's time to make a career change, a lot of us will hesitate and muddle ahead doing something we don't enjoy. Why don't we make the jump? Because fear gets in the way.
I was coaching someone yesterday and we started talking about visionary leadership. We were looking at her 360 results and
Good coaches have a special quality about them. They are able to get you to a place where you feel confident enough to take on a challenge or comfortable enough to confront an issue. If you are thinking about moving your career along, or are thinking about how to coach someone who is ready to jump, keep in mind the following tenets.
There is an inherent flaw in the sentence "Do what makes you happy." People usually choose their initial career paths around the age of 18 -- does every person continue to enjoy doing the same for the rest of his or her life?Happiness is not my ultimate goal. Failure, however, is my ultimate deterrent. I simply do not want to live pay-cheque to pay-cheque in Canada or end up unsuccessful, a decade from now.