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caribou

His government's review of the Endangered Species Act frames protecting at-risk species as a "barrier to economic development."
Government is responsible for ethical wildlife management and should take into account and plan for the well-being of future generations.
Habitat maintenance and restoration should be recognized as a cost of doing business.
Wow.
First Nations in Northern Canada have relied on caribou for millennia, for food, clothing and more. They've followed, observed and hunted the animals. They've seen changes in habits and populations as their territories face increasing development pressures. They've handed down knowledge through generations.
Predation is an important natural function. But as the human population has grown, we've taken over management of ecosystems once based on mutually beneficial relationships that maintained natural balances. How are we, a "super predator," aligning with or diverging from natural predation processes that shaped the world?
Federal assessments show high levels of oil, gas and forestry activity mean no boreal Caribou herd in Alberta is likely to survive without significant changes in habitat management. In 2011, the range of the Little Smoky herd was assessed as being 95 per cent disturbed by industrial activity, and oil, gas and forestry have since caused further damage.
Industrial activity has profoundly affected the Blueberry River First Nations in northern B.C. In much of the territory, which once supported healthy moose and caribou populations, it's difficult if not impossible to walk half a kilometre before hitting a road, seismic line or other industrial infrastructure.
A report to be released later today by the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society shows the woodland caribou are still under
Without the forest and the economic activity it generates, the North Shore, the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean and all the other forest regions of Quebec would not have experienced the same level of economic development that has benefited all Quebecers. However, forestry activity could fall sharply in the fairly near future.