HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

cbc

Video killed the radio in 1979, now in 2017 our generation is killing traditional television viewing with a steady decline in cable subscription as more Canadians use their online devices (and televisions) to stream digital content from services such as Netflix, Crave and Amazon Prime Video.
On January 20, 2017, producers for the CBC program Marketplace printed t-shirts containing racist logos and mottos, including "white power" and "white pride world wide [sic]," and hired a middle-aged white man to stand on a Toronto street to peddle the t-shirts and yell racist slogans. Not only is this episode the epitome of so-called "fake news" -- fabricating a story in order to report it -- it's also deeply ironic. By broadcasting this content in Alberta, the CBC likely violated Alberta's hate speech law.
Back when the primaries kicked off, the trolls found a common hero in Trump. Someone on the outside the norm of the establishment, someone not taken seriously. Someone himself a master at getting reactions from making a single statement. I mean, that's the whole purpose of trolling, isn't it? Get people defensive and engage them to react with real emotions and sincerity.
Two Canadian dramas are aiming to bring a bit of cable edge to mainstream networks. "Pure" is a crime-drama whose premise might sound like a joke: The Mennonite Mob! While "Mary Kills People" is about a doctor who has an illegal side-line helping people commit suicide.
The real problem is that pretty much all news these days is fake. I'm not saying it's always fabricated in a room somewhere with the blatant and malicious intent to deceive -- but it is, nonetheless, very often misleading, prejudiced, intentionally or inadvertently deceptive and agenda-driven. Every snowfall is a "blizzard" these days. Every rainfall demands a "special weather statement" from the government weather service and "Storm Team Coverage" of a "Rain Storm Warning." There is no real news anymore.
You're welcome.
Around 250 people die each year waiting for an organ transplant.
Kim's Convenience may be breaking ground with its Korean-Canadian focus. But arguably it can still fall into the trap of putting people into "us" and "them" boxes. And, sadly, that too shows how truly universal it is.
My father, Wang Bingzhang, is a Chinese political prisoner currently serving the 14th year of a life sentence for his work in pro-democracy activism. In 2002, while in Vietnam, my father was abducted into China and arrested by Chinese police. Six months later, he had a sham trial, found guilty, and sentenced to life in prison.
The B.C. government is in the midst of saturating television shows and social media news feeds in the province with a multimillion-dollar back-patting advertising campaign in advance of the 2017 election. The B.C. Liberal party -- who clearly have money to burn -- is getting in on the act as well with mood-setting political ads.