HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

cf-18

At the height of the Cold War, Canada was still holding periodic diplomatic talks with the former Soviet Union and although both countries strongly disagreed with each other, they kept talking. Nowadays, Ottawa has decided to send a message of strong opposition and unwillingness to make the situation less delicate.
Amongst our generals and military advisers there is a consensus that we need a new fighter-bomber to provide these functions for Canada. But amongst the chattering classes there is a virtual free-for-all about not just which aircraft should be purchased, but how we should go about getting one.
A nearly $500-million upgrade to the country's CF-18 jet fighters, ordered by the Harper government almost two years ago
Does Canada need a fifth-generation stealth multirole fighter? I don't think so. As a matter of fact, beside the F-35 fiasco in general, Canada cannot afford such an expensive plane that had limited capabilities. A project worth more than $8 billion at the start, many experts now evaluate it at more than $49 billion. This might include all acquisition, sustainment and operating costs but does not guarantee the price won't go up again due other issues with the aircraft.
As a matter of fact, it could take decades, if not more. Canada pulled out of Afghanistan too early and I believe the same will happen in Iraq. Although the mission is completely different, our contribution to training troops remains almost identical.
The Canadian Forces will once again have to wait to receive new much-needed equipment. Whether it is new fighter aircraft, ships or vehicles, the federal budget has postponed more than $3.7 billion in military spending until 2020 -- or later. As a matter of fact, the latest federal budget is another slap to the Canadian Forces' face. Bill Morneau, Canada's finance minister, said the Liberals are postponing defence spending to figure out defence priorities.
Only 27 per cent told the Angus Reid Institute that they were on the same page as Trudeau.
Another multimillion-dollar military purchase has gone off the rails. The Harper government is terminating its contract with
The widening fallout from a botched program to replace Canada's aging CF-18 fighter jets may be damaging the military's relationships
On Friday, Prime Minister Harper announced that Canada would join allies, including the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Australia, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Jordan and others in launching air strikes against ISIL in Iraq. The announcement on Friday builds on the growing engagement that Canada has recently taken part in with respect to Iraq on a variety of fronts. Against ISIL and its genocidal agenda in Iraq, it's timely that Canada has stepped up.