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change

Twenty-somethings often find themselves paralyzed with indecision as they anxiously deliberate the creation of career, family, and future when on the doorstep of graduation. So what's a twenty-something entering the workforce to do? Consider these three steps.
When we work on ourselves in ways that connect and care for our overall wellbeing, when we get to 'know thyself', and look
A period of major change in one's life often provokes fear or anger, before making way for angst, uncertainty, and melancholy. And then, eventually, a more buoyant feeling of hope, optimism, and happiness. I have playlists of my own to help me through the change cycle -- for each stage.
One of my earliest memories as a child was going to Prince's Island Park in Calgary every June to walk The World Partnership Walk. Back then, I looked forward to it because we made it a family affair. I would head down to the park with my family and it seemed that in exchange for walking a mere 8 kilometers or so, I would receive a delicious chili lunch, have a chance to part in some fun activities, get my face painted and even come away with a few prizes (it was all well worth the stickers).
We've all heard the saying "It's like herding cats." As challenging as that might be, it's not much more difficult than building consensus with a global committee: everyone has a different view, and often a territorial approach to meetings. In fact, while herding cats is tough, creating a brand change in corporations may be even tougher.
Since its inception in January 2013, Facebook page Calgary Compliments has taken our city by storm. So what exactly is the purpose to a page like this? Unlike similar "confessions" pages which have been popping all over the interwebs, this compliments page is a civic outreach initiative to help Calgarians bond.
Not so long ago, I was a fresh new medical student with a strong interest in global issues and a background on social activism
I am not making a case that change is bad, but I am saying that for change to work, that is, for it to be sustainable, it needs to become a habit. And it feels like the only habit that we know right now is how to change. Not how to sustain it.
In a nutshell: life is chaos, it's all my fault, but I just can't help it so bite me. I'm a busy woman who is chewing what she has bitten off as fast as she can. I'm a hot mess, always in a rush to get where I'm going, dragging my poor son behind me. But damn it, I'm doing it. I'm getting there. There is room for improvement for sure. But at this dawn of a new calendar year, I'm not going to make a grand pledge to change.
We seem, as a culture, so willing to deny and rationalize the very things that we inherently know are not good for us now, and certainly pose problems for our future. I'll admit easily that change is hard, especially in our busy lives, but what's the alternative?