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Charles Sousa

The former Mississauga mayor has also endorsed Liberal candidate Charles Sousa.
Did you know that the fastest growing line item in the Ontario Liberal budget is interest payments on debt? At $11.5 billion, interest on debt is the fourth biggest spending category in the Liberal budget. This might be good for bankers and bondholders. . But it's not good for you. It's not good for most people in Ontario.
Every winter, the Ontario Standing Committee on Finance invites groups to make submissions about what they would like to see in the spring budget. Every year, the Canadian Taxpayers Federation does what no other group in Ontario does: they ask the government to spend less money, not more.
GTA house prices have doubled in eight years.
Fifty years ago we fixed the problem through vision and leadership by creating the CPP. Today we need to fortify the CPP to give future generations of Canadians confidence that they can live with dignity when their working life comes to an end. It's a proven and sensible approach.
A deal requires the consent of seven of the 10 provinces with two-thirds of Canada's population.
There's nothing magical about the ninth consecutive deficit, or the $296 billion in debt the province will have as of March 31. Nor in the nearly one billion per month in interest payments our government has us paying. But Wynne and Sousa's commitment that the budget will be balanced next year requires faith in the supernatural.
News that Premier Christy Clark has spent $500,000 on private jets since assuming office has -- not surprisingly -- raised a few eyebrows. It's a story that has as much to do with the symbolism as it does with the dollars. A political condition that the government seems increasingly tone deaf to as of late.
OLG has locked workers out of four sites in the last four months of 2015 -- in Brantford, Sudbury, Woodbine/Toronto (all since ended) and most recently Rideau-Carleton/Ottawa. Management locked out 124 of its workers after they rejected what any reasonable observer would conclude was a very lousy offer.