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Charlotte Ottaway

The best way to break away from stigma around depression and suicide is to talk about it. This post was originally published
It's exhausting, this constant pressure that exists in the "real world." We're making decisions today that outline the rest of our lives. The choices we make now help us discover who we are, what we want in life, where we live and what people we want to spend our time with. How do you know which path is best? The truth is, you don't.
After suffering such a significant loss, Carly has learned to cherish what is truly important. She talks about how grateful she is to have people in her life who she knows will always stand by her side, no matter what. "There aren't words to describe how much my family means to me."
Many millennials have grown up on social media. We communicate in 140-characters or less. Our memories are edited through
This post was originally published on The Reply. Raeven Bell knew she wanted to get married in the fall. She imagined the
The fact is there will always be people who need help. There will always be critics who seek to divert attention to a "more worthy" cause. But the bigger picture here is a vast community is coming together to raise awareness and drive change. Thanks to the help of social media, people of all ages, professions and life circumstances are donating.
On March 11, 2001, a woman named April died by suicide. Her friend Jenn was the one who found her. It was an extremely traumatic event in Jenn's life. It transformed her entire world. Let's encourage others to have careful and candid conversations about suicide. For Jenn's family, suicide exists at the dinner table and at every family gathering, because there's always an empty chair. But most families are not having these conversations.