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child rearing

Even though I knew it would be pretty stressful to go to IKEA with two toddlers, I just needed one item -- a picture frame -- and we were driving right by it. RIGHT BY. So I turned, even though I hadn't been planning to, and I parked in the underground parking lot, and we headed to IKEA.
Have you heard this before? Are you a dedicated breast-feeder to a toddler or older child? If so, you are not alone. I see many women in my office each week who continue to breastfeed their toddlers, sometimes while also nursing younger babies. Women who breastfeed "older" children are often stigmatized and looked at as strange.
Saying that education is changing is kind of an obvious statement. Our kids study subject matter that wasn't even on the menu 20 years ago, they do it in ways that have been previously untried, and they have a brave new world of tech to help them do it. However, the changing role of parents in supporting these new methods of teaching learning tends to get overlooked.
Dear Daughter, I'm writing this not to let you know how much I love you, and I do. So much. Not to tell you how proud you've made me and how talented you are. You have. You are. I'm writing you to let you know that I understand. That I care.
May is masturbation month. Shocking as the word and act are to many, masturbation is a normal aspect of childhood sexuality that many parents find difficult to talk about. Part of this is the difficulty in acknowledging that kids are sexual beings.
There are always more chores, events, crying kids in a day than there are hours, hands and consolation waffles. Over time I'd come to see this doesn't mean I'm failing. It means that we aren't meant to do it all, rather we are meant to make choices about how we spend our time and energies.
Before I had kids, I dreamed about being a stay-at-home mom. I loved the idea of having the whole household under control and making life easy for my husband by rocking the homemaker role. But as it turns out, I am happy in that role about one day per week and otherwise feel totally and utterly stifled.
Giving up drinking for nine months was easy. It was a no brainer. Plus I was so nauseous I don't think I could have had a drink even if I had wanted to. But here's the kicker. I've officially given up alcohol. For good. My son is almost one year old and I'm coming up to two years sober.
I am about to experience my 12th Mother's Day, and this year I want to share a secret to dads and kids everywhere about what us moms really want. I didn't realize it until my daughter gave me a gift this past birthday. It was simple, cost nothing, and has awakened me to what I really want in life.
I didn't know what to expect when I became a Dad. I didn't lack good fatherly figures -- I just had no clue of what the world expected of me. We hear plenty of stories blaming fathers in absentia for children's bad behaviour, society diagnosing a lack of the firm disciplinarian they so sorely needed to keep them in line -- but people rarely talk about what the value of a good father is.