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Chinese economy

Kung Hei Fat Choi! The Chinese New Year is the most important holiday in Chinese culture, celebrated with traditional decorations, family reunions, fireworks and, of course, delicious feasts.
Forget weather, housing prices, lifestyle, green initiatives and other external factors and complaints. Yes, they are all variables but when it comes to consumer spending, there's one big variable driving the market almost to the exclusion of anything else: China and the Chinese.
Every day I hear about a real estate bubble on the edge of bursting, with home sale prices exponentially rising well above assessment values. I don't think it's a surprise to anyone that foreign investment from Chinese investors over the past few years, and even decades, has been a major contributor to our real estate boom.
The largest risk to Canada’s economy isn't the slowdown in the oil industry, or the spectre of a housing bubble — it’s the
As the Greek debt drama plays itself out one 60-euro withdrawal at a time, some economic observers are saying the world is
On Monday the renminbi (RMB -- Chinese currency) will step into Canada with the inauguration of the only RMB hub in the Americas. We know in Canada it will be greeted with fanfare, but what is less certain is whether or not Canadian exporters and international investors will take action once the celebration ends. Should they?
China has quietly developed the world's first land-based missile system -- Dong Feng 21Ds -- capable of sinking aircraft carriers from a long way off: to wit, more than 1,500 kilometers, or a bit more than the distance between Winnipeg and Vancouver. That's a long way out into the East and South China Seas.
With the recent Russian-inspired tragedies in eastern Ukraine and the war between Israel and Hamas in Gaza, much of the world is understandably focused on those regions. But another continent, Asia, is worth watching, particularly Chinese government action vis-à-vis Hong Kong.
China is again faced with the pre-crisis problems that were all the rage. First, how does it, and the rest of the world, cope with the demands of the 40 million odd new entrants to its middle class every year? And what if these really become a Western-style consumer class? Third, how does China sustainably manage its growth?
Pessimism is a hallmark of the post-crisis period, and it was with us for so long, we almost didn't notice. Confidence -- its polar opposite -- is one of those necessities that we take for granted. That is, until they are taken away. Without confidence, at best we cower in the shadows, coming out to carry on basic activities, and scurrying back for shelter. At worst, it causes the collapse of financial systems and the distribution of goods and services -- in a word, chaos. But this year, we regained something: hope.