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chlorine

It uses plants and zooplankton to stay clean.
One of the things that people often overlook when comparing city life with country living is the water. I was trying to articulate this to an urban colleague a few days ago. Living in the country has its water advantages, but it also has water drawbacks.
If your eyes are red, someone peed in the pool.
In many areas of Canada, like Ontario, the levels of potentially pathogenic microbes can flourish and overwhelm our water treatment system leading to boil water orders or worse, outbreaks. These moments are thankfully rare in part to the addition of a particular chemical, chlorine. For decades, chlorine has been used to keep drinking water safe and is standard practice in many parts of Canada and the world. But it's not a perfect system and faces many hurdles. The most important of these is ensuring water is safe over the tens to hundreds of kilometres of pipes from the facility to the tap.
Ottawa paramedics say they treated 54 people, mostly children, and took three people to hospital after a large group inhaled
Of all the places to which sun seekers migrate, none is as popular as the beach or swimming pool. For many, there is nothing quite like becoming one with the water. Unfortunately, the escape comes with its own challenges, namely that of infections.
One of the most common chemicals used in pools is chlorine and less common, bromine. The problem with these chemicals is that they are detrimental to your health. If you are going to be swimming in a pool, there are a few simple things you can do to mitigate the damages.