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chronic illness

A dad shares advice on how to handle the hard days.
COVID-19 means accessibility has suddenly become everybody's priority. It should stay that way.
My two small children are learning compassion and empathy, and tolerance and acceptance for people who are different.
Each hospitalization has challenged me in ways that I could never have prepared myself for. Though such phases of pain and discomfort eventually pass, I live knowing the illness will reappear. But the more times I become sick, the more my strength and resilience deepen.
We cannot allow PharmaCare to force any of the 25,000 British Columbians living with Crohn's or colitis to give up a treatment that's working well in exchange for a lower cost alternative. This is a possibility in the province and a worrying prospect for people who have finally found stability.
By Joe Farago, Executive Director Healthcare Innovation at Innovative Medicines Canada It's tough to talk about mental illness
For many people, this is a time to leave bad habits behind and face the upcoming year with motivation and a new set of commitments. For those of us living with chronic disease however, we cannot escape the burden of our illness or the daily challenges we face.
Empathy, sadness, joy and a sense of family are just some of the immediate feelings I had when I ended my FaceTime conversation with Dan Reynolds, lead singer of Imagine Dragons. Dan and I have something in common called ankylosing spondylitis, or AS for short. Instead of getting into a long, drawn-out medical definition, I will describe it like this: our bodies are attacking themselves, and there is no cure. Most of us AS sufferers have to deal with chronic pain 24/7.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Over the last decade, researchers have gained insight into how certain gut microbes, particularly bacteria, influence our health. They have learned the mere presence of some species can affect us. Yet the majority of effects on wellness come as a result of the byproducts these organisms make.