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citizenship oath

Nearly 73,000 Syrian refugees have been resettled in Canada since 2015.
"My solidarity is to Canada and humanity, which is based on justice and decency and being a good citizen of the world, not to an antiquated system of 'royals and royalties, kings, queens, princesses and on."
We still have a foreign person, a queen living in a castle on another continent -- Victoria's great, great, granddaughter, in fact -- as Canada's head of state. And it's a pretty safe bet that Canada isn't on her mind a whole lot either, if at all. So why do we put up with it? Without question, Canada deserves to have its own head of state, chosen by us and from among our citizens. How have we made it this far without taking the final step to full nationhood? The reason lies with misinformation.
Supreme Court opts not to hear appeal from three people who don't want to swear allegiance to Queen in citizenship ceremony.
CALGARY - A Muslim group based in Calgary is urging the prime minister to reverse his plans for the government to appeal
The trio had argued that the provision in the Citizenship Act that requires would-be citizens to swear to be "faithful and
TORONTO - Allowing would-be citizens to opt out of a "repugnant" oath to the Queen would cause no harm and allow them to
2012-04-27-mediabitesreal.jpg Not all oral confirmations are created equal. Take Canada's oath of citizenship. A bunch of people are challenging it before an Ontario judge at the moment on the basis that it's neither a meaningful symbol nor a useful tradition, just an absurd and oppressive indignity. It's not a welcome. It's a hazing.
A group of immigrants applying for Canadian citizenship are going to court and demanding to cede the oath to "her Majesty Queen Elizabeth." There is a simple answer to this non-problem. Don't move here. Don't move to one of the 43 nations with a monarchy either.
TORONTO - New citizens would be swearing an oath to Canada rather than to the Queen had former prime minister Jean Chretien