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clean technology

British Columbia is at risk of being left behind as the global economy shifts and the costs of a changing climate begin to mount. Building a strong, clean growth economy is imperative to ensure Canada's westernmost province remains competitive.
The risks of not enacting change significantly outweigh the risks of implementing new technologies. Holding back is already costing us money and causing further damage to the environment, and the longer we wait, the worse it will get. Canada has an opportunity to be a leader and to show the world that it is possible.
Clean technologies are increasingly being viewed as a future driver for the Canadian economy, creating well-paid jobs and export revenues. The recently released Global Cleantech 100, a rigorously researched list of the world's most promising clean technology ventures, reveals why: Of the 100 companies listed, 11 were Canadian.
The month since Donald Trump's election win has been a fraught one for the clean technology industry. First came shock that
So, how much better is Canada's climate target than before the Liberals swept to power? Astonishingly, not one bit. Despite all the activity that has taken place, Canada is ignoring its greenhouse gas emissions reduction goal. Given the scale of the threat, how do we get our new prime minister to do the right thing? We have to demand it of him.
It's become a cliché to say that out of crisis comes opportunity. But there's no denying that when faced with crises, we have choices. The opportunity depends on what we decide to do. What choices will we make when confronted with the fact that 2014 will likely be the hottest year on record? Will politicians close their eyes while fossil fuel industry executives shovel money at them and enlist propagandists to spread misinformation and lies?
Although extraction, use and export of natural resources are economically important and will remain so for some time, we're starting to diversify. According to Ottawa-based consultants Analytica Advisors, clean technology, or clean-tech, is the country's fastest-growing industry. The firm's "2014 Canadian Clean Technology Report," found direct employment by clean-tech companies rose six per cent from 2011 to 2012, from 38,800 people to 41,000, with revenues increasing nine per cent to $11.3-billion.
Any socially transformative movement gets to a point where it needs to be fully embraced by the people it impacts. The green power movement within Canada is at just such a point. The past decade has seen an increase in the number of options available to Canadians to support renewable energy -- often associated with a premium cost to the consumer.