co2

Keeping your things in good working order is likely to extend their use, prevent major repairs, lower energy bills, and reap savings on car and home insurance. To illustrate how you can reduce the CO2 emissions in everyday life, we'll break it down into two main groups: driving your car and the household.
Climate change is "Made in China," but they get off scot-free. We need to admit one simple truth: handicapping Canadians with a tax will have zero effect on global climate change. However, that doesn't mean we can't exert influence and pursue real solutions.
Last week marked the 10th anniversary of An Inconvenient Truth, the Al Gore documentary that catapulted climate change onto the global agenda. Here's a quick look at developments over the past decade, both the inconvenient and the convenient.
Curbing fossil fuel use, China's leaders understand, would dampen its already faltering growth and provide an existential threat to their rule. While they may talk a good game at the UN's Paris talks, they will make no binding commitments to reduce C02.
There are a group of people often overlooked in the fight against climate change and they can be one of our greatest allies as we figure out how to limit the damage from extreme weather, rising seas and threats to food security. They are the millions of indigenous people who live in the world's remaining forests. Often overlooked, ignored, marginalized and attacked, they stand at the heart of a global solution on climate change that all of us, whether we live in big cities or remote villages, can benefit from.
Algae is a pretty important organism. The first plants on earth probably evolved from algae. It's used in food, fertilizer and sewage treatment. Oh, and algae can also eat raw industrial smokestack emissions for breakfast.
An Australian government authority approved on Friday the dumping of three-million cubic metres of dredging spoil within
The IPCC Report was in the news for a couple of days and then disappeared from mass media news cycle. This is the largest crisis humanity has ever faced: Life on earth hangs in the balance. And yet the media attention given to Miley Cyrus twerking was infinitely greater than the coverage of the IPCC report.
The Quebec Government announced that it will update its energy policy. Public consultations are already underway. The Government also announced a commission to study ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
It's becoming clearer that what we are putting into the environment is returning to haunt us, resulting in unnecessary loss of lives, malnourishment, disease and starvation. Another key lesson is, the developed nations are not shielded from climate change, nor do they have the capacity to deal with a devastation of such cataclysmic proportion as the recent severe weather event in Colorado.