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comics

The art form's contribution to society is more than just "kid stuff."
Contemporary artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas merges Haida cultural memory with Asian brush techniques.
Many of the issues are universal.
"Times have changed. And as the audience changes, so do the superheroes."
For Debra DiGiovanni, speaking to a full house is much more appealing than speaking to a group of six. The visual artist turned comedian has been doing stand-up for more than 15 years. While she knows that she's most comfortable when behind a microphone, the industry and audiences are still getting accustomed to seeing more women take the stage.
While hardly a fan of awards (personally afflicted with "always a bridesmaid, never a bride" syndrome), I love nothing more than to use my unqualified opinion to judge others. Who is qualified, anyway? Reviews and art criticism are the pinnacle of narcissism, which is why I generally keep to myself on such matters.
There has been a colossal breakdown of the Archie family business, and it sounds like something right out of the movies; egos, lawyers, yelling matches, sexual harassment claims, defamation lawsuits and restraining orders. This one has it all. It makes me think of different measures that friends and family members can take when entering into businesses ventures
I had spent a whole afternoon scribbling on the entry hall wall, up the staircase wall and onto the second floor sitting room wall. In those days, the discipline of choice for Chinese families was the bamboo cane feather duster. That too, I remember painfully well. So it is with much affection that I open and dedicate my graphic novel, Escape to Gold Mountain, to Granny with her words: "David! Stop drawing on the walls! When you grow up, you had better still not be drawing cartoons!"
Even as comic collecting declined in the 1990s, its fan-oriented subcultural set-up spread to other groups who began joining forces for broader genre cons like Fan Expo and Comic-Con, while slowly turning their favorite things, be it Lost or Lord of the Rings and the contemporary comic-book movie, into mainstream success stories.