commodities

If the year has taught us anything, what stands out is being different and not following the pack in consensus or action. While typical "hedge funds", as ironic as that sounds, struggled, not all were negative.
There are a number of similarities between Donald Trump and Natural Gas. Not only are both a surprise, seemingly sneaking
The reality is that the performance of a commodity producing company is affected by many outside factors that could significantly impact their stock price.
In the long list of market unknowns, Donald J. Trump and the US Presidential race is the unknown. The result of the election could have massive implications on the markets, even if we are unsure about what they are. When looking to commodities, a weaker US dollar will drive prices higher, but this may be offset by concerns over a slowing economy.
Combined with the dramatic crash in fox fur prices, significant changes in Canada's welfare system post-WWII left Northern communities in a state of dependence. Family allowances became the major source of income, adding pressure on Inuit communities to conform and "modernize" according to Western standards. By the 1960s, most Inuit abandoned their semi-nomadic lifestyle, some by force, to live in permanent settlements. This new way of life was in complete rupture with their past.
If you have something the rest of the world wants, you figure out how to profit by providing it; you do not denigrate the opportunity before you. That's just common sense. It's also common sense that you exploit other opportunities to make money. One does not prevent pursuing the other.
The role of the Canadian government in both the short and long term should be to embrace and foster the growth of all parts of our diverse economy. The government should certainly not champion some sectors and demoralize others. Sadly, we have already started to see that approach by the Trudeau government.
The loonie was at 72.07 cents U.S., up 0.05 cents from Wednesday's close. It has fallen about 16 per cent over the past year
It remains a highly sensitive subject for Canadians who spent the past decade being told the country was on the path to becoming a global energy super power.
"It'll feel like a recession depending on where you live in the country," said John Stephenson, chief executive of hedge