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communication skills

While research increasingly places feeling valued and getting promoted on the same level as being well paid, we still need to feel we are being fairly paid. I have always felt that compensation is another way of keeping score and of measuring your professional value.
Silent prayer aside, there are many things that can derail your speaking awesomeness. Technology, traffic, timing, too-tight shoes and other terrible things can wreak havoc on the unprepared speaker. Luckily, most of these things can be avoided with a little planning.
Rather than taking control of the room, have you ever had self-doubt and a surge of discomfort envelope you as you are being introduced? Has your mouth suddenly gone dry and does the microphone always seem to act up? Do you ever lose concentration and draw a blank? These and other personal nervous habits often rear their heads when we are standing before an audience.
We're human, even at work. Which means that every now and again we're going to screw up. When that happens (and it will) apologize and do better next time. Not sure how to stumble through an apology at work? (Because... um, hello, awkward!) Here's how to get it right.
When most of us are asked what makes one a great communicator we usually emphasize speaking or writing ability. When in fact, the art of communicating rest with improving our passive listening. Active and passive listening are as different as listening and hearing.
I was consulting for a luxury car dealership not knowing what to expect. I'm one of those people who think "just get me from
Our message gets through only when we understand with whom we are communicating and their needs, the urgency of the message, and the desired next steps our message will trigger.
Last week I met Ani at a workshop I was giving. Ani is a very direct communicator and she feels strongly that her own blunt style of communication is best. She has no intention of changing her style and, in fact, has many reasons why she won't change.
We make three fundamental mistakes around communication that can really jeopardize an otherwise viable relationship, and there are three important communication skills that can make the difference between an unhappy break-up and an ongoing, happy relationship.
The problem for many parents is that they want to become friends with their children, rather than heroes. Our children do not need more friends, and they certainly do not need their parents competing with their friends for their attention. But as a hero, you can find a way to transform challenge into growth.