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communications

Big Telecom is up to its old tricks again. They've invested some of their record profits into an expensive PR campaign, including misleading full page newspaper ads, in a clear effort to try to convince Canadians that cell phone service is not as bad as we know it is. Canadians will be asking why the Big Three don't put that money instead towards addressing their systematic mistreatment of cell phone users.
Even after the CRTC and Industry Canada announcements, Canadians are still stuck with a broken wireless market, 94 per cent dominated by just three unaccountable Big Telecom conglomerates. It's become increasingly clear that Canadians need a long-term solution rather than a failed piecemeal approach.
Where does the PR professional fit into a marketing mix that now includes heavy online and social media components? How do they adapt to a landscape where coverage options have decreased due to shrinking newsrooms? The tools, strategies and skill sets for the job have changed. Enter the hybrid PR professional.
Handling media relations, whether for a politician, a corporation or an NGO is not for the faint of heart. Or the weak of stomach -- I always tell new-to-the-job media relations specialists to lay in a supply of Maalox. And go easy on the Scotch.
In a time where anyone with a smartphone can become a news aggregator or citizen journalist, corporations appear to following suit, and are coming down with a serious lack of continuity in their communications. I'm talking about how understanding what some companies are trying to stand for these days has become an impossible task.
Send those thank you emails. Send them liberally and sincerely. While efficiency is key, particularly in a business capacity, I also appreciate doing business with nice people. Kindness and thoughtfulness go a long way in building and maintaining relationships, a distance that efficiency alone cannot.
Everything is getting connected to the Internet. From your toaster and home thermometer to your fridge and your car. As these appliances do "come online," can you even begin to imagine the media opportunities that arise from such a wealth of human information?
Consider the rise of Likelihood to Recommend (L2R) as a business metric with growing appeal. Many large businesses have collapsed complex success metrics to judge their own business by asking customers: "Would you recommend me to others?" -- the foundation of L2R or Net Promoter Scores (NPS).
Members of the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada have voted overwhelmingly in favour of joining forces
Tens of thousands of workers in the Alberta oilsands could soon be subject to random alcohol and drug testing under a two