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communism

Very sadly, large numbers of Canadians are turning their backs on the principles and values I hold dear, the principles and values of which I am so proud. The principles and values that paved the way for my family, and so many others, to have that better life they craved.
Fidel Castro, the Cuban dictator, haunts me still. He haunted me during his life. He haunts me post-mortem as I read about
The problem is that, by monochromatically portraying Fidel Castro simply as a brutal dictator -- full stop -- the western media has had to do pretzel-twists to explain away the reality of why so many people in Cuba, Latin America and, indeed, much of the developing world do see him as an heroic, larger than life figure, whose passing is a cause for sadness while his legacy is reason for celebration.
Fidel Castro was no saint. He was a cruel dictator who oppressed and terrorized the Cuban people for nearly 50 years. Anybody who remembers him fondly is ignoring his trail of human rights violations, while openly supporting a communist regime.
Fidel Castro will forever be remembered as one of the most controversial figures in modern history, to his many adoring supporters
Their parents don't feel the same way.
Every November 11, we honour those who risked or lost their lives defending their country. Rarely acknowledged in these annual commemorations are those who served honourably but were nevertheless dishonoured because of their sexuality.
Unlike the iron fist of communism, capitalism's incidents of harm (recall the mugging in Central Park) result not from government oppression but from the nature of freedom itself. Misguided newspaper columns notwithstanding, in theory, practice and historical record, between capitalism and communism, there's no comparison.
What worries me most in all this is the growing sense that the public, and the politicians who represent the public, have ever less capability to do anything about it. Between the influence of big money over politics and the desire to remain economically competitive with countries that provide few social services, there is little room to bring balance back to our extreme economy.
The 21st century resembles the 19th century -- not in the size of government but in the obvious tussles between special interests and the general interest.